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Correction to: Emerging models and trends in mental health crisis care in England: a national investigation of crisis care systems

The Original Article was published on 29 October 2021

Correction to: BMC Health Serv Res 21, 1174 (2021)

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07181-x

Following publication of the original article [1], the authors identified an error in the author name of Kathleen Kelly. The given name and family name were erroneously transposed.

The incorrect author name is: Kelly Kathleen.

The correct author name is: Kathleen Kelly.

In addition, an error was identified in the Discussion section.

The sentences currently read:

In addition to a lack of evidence, the criticism has been mainly focused on the ethics of police involvement in mental health care. The criticism has led to a coalition including people with relevant lived experience, clinicians and policy makers, protesting against the model’s deployment [49,50,51], resulting in policy makers requiring Trusts urgently to review its further use.

The sentences should read:

In addition to a lack of evidence, criticisms have included ethical problems with police involvement in mental health crisis care and potential harms of inappropriate diversion from healthcare. The StopSIM coalition of service users [49] has led a campaign against the model's deployment. This has led to concerns also being raised by professional and voluntary sector bodies [50-51], and the campaign has resulted in policy-makers requiring Trusts urgently to review the further use of SIM.

Reference 49 is changed to: StopSIM: Mental illness is not a crime. https://stopsim.co.uk/ Accessed 5/11/2021, and Reference 51 is changed with the previous Reference 49: Centre for Mental Health. Updated: Centre for Mental Health responds to the Serenity Integrated Mentoring (SIM) model. 2021.

The author group has been updated above and the original article [1] has been corrected.

Reference

  1. Dalton-Locke, et al. Emerging models and trends in mental health crisis care in England: a national investigation of crisis care systems. BMC Health Serv Res. 2021;21:1174. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07181-x.

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Correspondence to Christian Dalton-Locke.

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Dalton-Locke, C., Johnson, S., Harju-Seppänen, J. et al. Correction to: Emerging models and trends in mental health crisis care in England: a national investigation of crisis care systems. BMC Health Serv Res 21, 1319 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07295-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07295-2