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Correction to: Hepatitis B virus perceptions and health seeking behaviors among pregnant women in Uganda: implications for prevention and policy

  • The original article was published in BMC Health Services Research 2019 19:760

Correction to: BMC Health Serv Res (2009) 19:760

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4516-0

In the original publication of this article [1], some values are missing in the Figure 1, Figure 2 and Figure 3. These errors were introduced during typesetting; thus the publisher apologizes for this error. Additionally, the original manuscript has also been updated to amend this error. The correct figures are shown below:

Fig. 1
figure1

Graph showing perceived lifetime risk for acquiring hepatitis B infection among pregnant women in Northern and Central Uganda. Low = risk was perceived as low, Moderate = risk was perceived as moderate, High = risk was perceived as high. North = participants from the Northern region. Central = participants from the Central region. Self = participants’ perceived risk for themselves. Child = participants’ perceived risk for their child. Spouse = participants’ perceived risk for their spouse

Fig. 2
figure2

Graph showing perceived lifetime risk for acquiring liver cancer among pregnant women in Northern and Central Uganda. Low = risk was perceived as low, Moderate = risk was perceived as moderate, High = risk was perceived as high. North = participants from the Northern region. Central = participants from the Central region. Self = participants’ perceived risk for themselves. Child = participants’ perceived risk for their child. Spouse = participants’ perceived risk for their spouse

Fig. 3
figure3

Perception of risk of getting liver cancer for self, spouse and child if one were to be infected with the hepatitis B virus, among pregnant women in Northern and Central Uganda. Low = risk was perceived as low, Moderate = risk was perceived as moderate, High = risk was perceived as high. North = participants from the Northern region. Central = participants from the Central region. Self = participants’ perceived risk for themselves. Child = participants’ perceived risk for their child. Spouse = participants’ perceived risk for their spouse

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Reference

  1. 1.

    Nankya-Mutyoba J, et al. Hepatitis B virus perceptions and health seeking behaviors among pregnant women in Uganda: implications for prevention and policy. BMC Health Serv Res. 2019;19:760. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4516-0.

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Correspondence to Joan Nankya-Mutyoba.

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Nankya-Mutyoba, J., Aizire, J., Makumbi, F. et al. Correction to: Hepatitis B virus perceptions and health seeking behaviors among pregnant women in Uganda: implications for prevention and policy. BMC Health Serv Res 19, 982 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4767-9

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