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Table 2 Descriptive results on overtime, compliance with break times / rest periods and shift work, duty planning and satisfaction with shift work

From: Factors associated with work-private life conflict and leadership qualities among line managers of health professionals in Swiss acute and rehabilitation hospitals – a cross-sectional study

  nurses & midwives physicians medical-technical prof. medical-therapeutic prof.
n = 1864 n = 284 n = 207 n = 230
Doing overtime
 Often-always 30% 63% 26% 25%
 Sometimes 47% 24% 54% 54%
 Seldom-never 23% 12% 20% 22%
Assessment of overtime
 Can count overtime 95% 57% 95% 93%
 Cannot measure overtime 2% 35% 1% 6%
 Can measure their overtime, but do not do it 3% 8% 3% 2%
Compensation for overtime (multiple responses)
 Compensation for overtime in the same month by holidays or free time 22% 25% 28% 54%
 Compensation for overtime in the following month or later by holidays or free time 86% 57% 85% 81%
 Not possible to compensate for overtime at all 7% 53% 9% 7%
 Compensation by getting paid for overtime 15% 16% 22% 8%
Compliance with break times
 Break times often-always take place 65% 50% 72% 82%
 Break times sometimes take place 22% 22% 21% 11%
 Break times seldom-never take place 13% 28% 7% 8%
Compliance with rest periods
 Rest periods are often-always observed 80% 62% 82% 93%
 Rest periods are sometimes observed 14% 28% 13% 4%
 Rest periods are seldom-never observed 6% 10% 5% 3%
Working in shifts (filter question, if ‘yes’ further questions)
 Yes 96% 90% 96% 18%
 No 4% 10% 4% 82%
Influence on their duty scheduling n = 1511 n = 127 n = 172 n = 14
 ‘Some - no’ influence on duty scheduling 84% 73% 71% 84%
 ‘Great’ influence on duty scheduling 16% 27% 29% 16%
Preference to change current shift work
 Yes 50% 47% 27% 50%
 No 50% 53% 73% 50%
Satisfaction with shift work
 Not satisfied with shift work in terms of their private life 21% 36% 11% 9%
 Not satisfied with shift work in terms of their personal well-being 33% 54% 17% 15%
  1. n number of cases