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Table 4 Stakeholder groups roles

From: Integrating care for individuals with FASD: results from a multi-stakeholder symposium

Stakeholder Group Role in caringfor individuals and families living with FASD
Families & Advocates 1) family advocacy, 2) social services, 3) constant need to educate everyone (e.g., physicians/medical, schools & others).
Primary Care (MDs, NPs) 1) medical (medication/case management), 2) diagnosis, 3) referral, 4) inter-jurisdictional issue resolution (e.g., north vs rural vs urban; provincial vs federal), 5) research, 6) education, and 7) advocacy.
Allied & Mental Health 1) support to pregnant women, 2) parenting/education, 3) prevention, 4) prevention of secondary disabilities, 5) intervention/follow-up, 6) research, 7) comprehensive assessments & diagnostic, 8) mental health diagnosis & confirmation of alcohol exposure, and 9) program planning & evaluation.
Government & Policy 1) providing community funding, 2) policy development/monitoring/updating (e.g. Provincial FASD Strategy), 3) identify priorities & opportunities, 4) training, 5) knowledge sharing (education), 6) creating linkages (e.g., team building), 7) collaboration (multiple levels), and 8) supporting research/evaluation.
Regional Health Authority – FASD Coordinators 1) anchored by the Manitoba FASD Centre, 2) diagnostic (consistency), 3) referrals, 4) assessments, 5) family support, 6) follow-up (services/treatment), 7) program evaluation, and 8) education (multiple groups).
Education 1) educate, 2) develop curricula, 3) meet curricula, 4) provide inclusive & least restrictive environment, 5) life skills, social skills & employment skills, 6) direct services to students, staff & caregivers, 7) advocacy – case management, access funding & services, 8) building teams & sense of community, and 9) training/professional development for multiple groups interacting with FASD.
Social Services 1) eligibility screening (FASD assessment), 2) training, 3) advocacy (families individuals), 4) coordination with other services/providers, 5) case management (link families with resources), 6) provide healthcare services, 7) FASD - program development, and 8) FASD - policy development.
Youth Justice 1) responder to FASD versus a service provider, 2) FASD Youth Justice Program: police, prosecution, defence counsel, probation officer, diagnostic coordinator, 3) focus on purpose in justice system but be aware of issues associated with FASD, 4) Education/Awareness (to multiple groups e.g., police and others), 5) diagnostic services, 6) referrals, 7) coordination with probation services, and 8) follow-up services/resources.