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Table 2 Perception of error disclosure, relative frequency and percentage of replies returned

From: The right to be informed and fear of disclosure: sustainability of a full error disclosure policy at an Italian cancer centre/clinic

Questions Yes No Missing
Do you think that admitting a mistake to the patient is:    
wrong 1 (2,1%) 13 (27.1%) 34 (70.8%)
an ethical and deontological duty 42 (87.5%) 0 (0.0%) 6 (15.5%)
the patient’s right 26 (54.2%) 1 (2.1%) 21 (43.8%)
necessary every time a mistake happens 18 (37.5%) 5 (10.4%) 25 (52.1%))
only necessary in cases of serious injury 4 (8.3%) 15 (31.2%) 33 (68.8%)
only necessary in cases of mild injury 1 (2.1%) 13 (27.1%) 34 (70.8%)
only necessary in cases where the patient is not harmed 2 (4.2%) 12 (25.0%) 34 (70.8%)
only necessary when the patient asks for an explanation 2 (4.2%) 12 (25.0%) 34 (70.8%)
helpful in avoiding medical lawsuits? 14 (29.2%) 4 (8.3%) 30 (62.5%)
Do you think that admitting a mistake to the patient:    
strengthens the patient’s trust in the doctor 31 (64.6%) 6 (12.5%) 11 (22.9%)
reduces the risk of medical lawsuits 23 (47.9%) 6 (12.5%) 19 (39.6%)
reduces the probability of the same error being repeated 23 (47.9%) 4 (8.3%) 21 (43.8%)
reduces the patient’s apprehensions about the likely outcome 12 (25.0%) 8 (16.7%) 28 (58.3%)
reduces the probability that the patient will change doctors and/or hospital? 14 (29.2%) 7 (14.6%) 27 (56.2%)