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Table 2 Hispanic Respondents perceptions of healthcare providers' communication behaviors by ethnic subgroup

From: Digging deeper: quality of patient-provider communication across Hispanic subgroups

MEPS Items Pertaining to Healthcare Providers Communication Behaviors Adjusted OR
(95% CI)a
Provider listened to them carefully b  
Central/South American 0.92 (0.46, 1.84)
Dominican 0.95 (0.35, 2.58)
Cuban 2.03 (0.91, 4.53)
Puerto Rican 1.94 (0.93, 4.05)
Mexican 1.36 (0.71, 2.60)
Other 1.00
Provider explained things so they understood b  
Central/South American 0.90 (0.50, 1.61)
Dominican 0.72 (0.29, 1.79)
Cuban 1.56 (0.72, 3.36)
Puerto Rican 1.67 (0.86, 3.27)
Mexican 1.18 (0.65, 2.13)
Other 1.00
Provider showed respect for what they had to say b  
Central/South American 0.88 (0.53, 1.45)
Dominican 0.86 (0.30, 2.47)
Cuban 1.31 (0.59, 2.87)
Puerto Rican 2.16 (1.16, 4.03)
Mexican 1.52 (0.91, 2.53)
Other 1.00
Provider spent enough time with them b  
Central/South American 1.06 (0.54, 2.08)
Dominican 0.65 (0.31, 1.35)
Cuban 2.03 (0.88, 4.66)
Puerto Rican 2.28 (1.06, 4.92)
Mexican 1.88 (1.02, 3.46)
Other 1.00
Provider asks person to help make health care decisions c  
Central/South American 0.46 (0.23, 0.95)
Dominican 0.43 (0.13, 1.49)
Cuban 0.95 (0.37, 2.39)
Puerto Rican 0.74 (0.37, 1.49)
Mexican 0.63 (0.33, 1.20)
Other 1.00
Provider shows respect for treatments c  
Central/South American 0.70 (0.34, 1.41)
Dominican 0.47 (0.20, 1.12)
Cuban 0.76 (0.30, 1.92)
Puerto Rican 0.69 (0.31, 1.54)
Mexican 0.84 (0.43, 1.66)
Other 1.00
  1. MEPS = Medical Expenditures Panel Survey, OR = odds ratio, CI = confidence interval
  2. aStatistical significance indicated by bold highlights.
  3. bEstimates pertain to Hispanic civilian, non-institutionalized U.S. adults who visited a healthcare provider in the past year. Multiple logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, selected language of interview, place of residence, family income, educational attainment, census region, health insurance status, and usual source of care.
  4. cEstimates pertain to Hispanic civilian, non-institutionalized U.S. adults who reported having a usual source of care in 2005. Multiple logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age, selected language of interview, place of residence, family income, educational attainment, census region, and health insurance status.