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Table 3 Changes in job satisfaction among all healthcare providers following EnPHC Interventions

From: The effects of enhanced primary healthcare interventions on primary care providers’ job satisfaction

Job satisfactionIntervention GroupControl GroupDifference*Coefficient (SE)95% CIp-value
Baseline
n = 544
17 months
n = 645
Baseline
n = 498
17 months
n = 570
1. Some parts of my work do not really make sense2.65(0.79)2.56(0.76)2.60(0.81)2.62(0.78)−0.11−0.120 (0.094)− 0.302, 0.0660.210
2. My work still interests me as much as it ever did3.10(0.58)3.26(0.58)3.10(0.58)3.27(0.60)- 0.01−0.001 (0.064)− 0.127, 0.1240.980
3. Overloaded with unnecessary administrative detail2.31(0.71)2.38(0.72)2.25(0.74)2.43(0.73)−0.11− 0.108 (0.071)− 0.248, 0.0320.130
4. Too much stress2.47(0.74)2.43(0.70)2.45(0.73)2.55(0.68)−0.14−0.139 (0.065)−0.266,
− 0.012
0.032
5. Well-respected job3.39(0.69)3.33(0.70)3.33(0.66)3.36(0.70)−0.09−0.083 (0.060)−0.200, 0.0340.166
6. Good balance between effort and reward2.88(0.69)2.92(0.65)2.92(0.62)2.95(0.65)0.010 (0.078)−0.153, 0.1540.995
  1. HCP healthcare provider, CI confidence interval
  2. *Change from baseline to 17 months, intervention group versus control group
  3. Note: Outcomes are adjusted for age, gender, educational level, professional roles, working duration in primary care settings, hours spent per week on direct patient care, location of clinics (urban/rural)