Skip to main content

Table 2 Pragmatic Literature Review Terms

From: Operationalizing the ‘pragmatic’ measures construct using a stakeholder feedback and a multi-method approach

Author (Year) Scientific Discipline Terms Relevant to the Pragmatic Construct
Pfieffer (1996) Treatment Outcomes confirm efficacy of intervention
  efficient
  lead to treatment planning
  low complexity
  low cost
  provide a clinical cut-off score
Slade (1999) Treatment Outcomes able to be photocopied
  acceptable
  allows feedback data to be returned in a positive way
  available
  benefits outweigh costs
  brief
  compliments clinical judgment
  contains readable indices
  easily accessible
  easy to use
  feasible
  flexible administration
  free
  low administration time
  meaningful for use in typical clinical settings
  non-duplicative
  offers relative advantage
  provides meaningful feedback
  provides understandable data to provider and patient
  reduces response bias related to social desirability
  relevant
  simple
  suitable for routine
  sustainable
  valuable
Anderson (2003) Treatment Outcomes brief
  demonstrates functional improvement
  easy to administer
  easy to score
  focused
  provides acute, clinically relevant information
Glasgow (2013) Treatment Outcomes actionable
  broadly applicable
  feasible for use in real world settings
  important to stakeholders
  psychometrically strong
  related to interventions
  related to theory or model
  relevant
  sensitive to change
  unlikely to cause harm
  used for benchmark
Auger (2006) Geriatric Rehabilitation able to detect clinically important change
  acceptable
  age appropriate
  applicable
  available
  clinically relevant
  compatible format
  easy to administer
  easy to use
  feasible
  identifies client difficulties
  low administration time
  low completion time
  low cost (administration, scoring, materials)
  low examiner burden
  low respondent burden
  offers clinical usefulness/utility/value
  practical
  provides clear instructions
  provides meaningful score distribution
  sensible
  short completion time
  significant assessment content
  simple presentation/administration
  useful for intervention planning or process
  useful for setting
  valid
Coghill (2011) Pediatric Psychopharmacology health-related quality of life measures
  impairment measures
Gelinas (2008) Pain Management accessible (allowed to be used)
  can be easily applied in clinical settings
  easy to complete
  feasible
  high clinical utility
  meaningful
  provides results that are useful in clinical setting
  quick to use
  results optimize care and patient outcomes
  simple to understand
  supports clinical practice and decision making to optimize care and patient outcomes
Kroenke (2015) Biomedical Research accessible/free/in the public domain
  available in different languages
  brevity of items
  can be administered electronically
  can be administered to vulnerable populations
  can be downloaded from the internet
  cross-cutting (used for multiple diseases/conditions)
  efficiently informs specific actions that will be embraced by practitioners
  includes easy-to-remember cut points
  leads to greater detection of problems in sensitive areas
  length, specificity, and granularity are suitable for the setting
  minimizes clinician or interviewer bias
  minimizes respondent burden
  minimizes time the clinician needs to devote to data collection
  multipurpose (screening, diagnosis, monitoring)
  provides score easily interpreted by clinicians and patients
  reliable and valid self-administration
  scores facilitate communication and decision-making
  scores guide diagnostic or therapeutic action/decision making
  simple/easy to score