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Table 1 Personal and BLS-related characteristics of the pre-BLS and post-BLS groups

From: Impact of basic life-support training on the attitudes of health-care workers toward cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation

  Pre-BLS n (%) 421 (56.7) Post-BLS n (%) 321 (43.3) Statistical analysis
Participants’ characteristics
 Gender
  Female 297 (70.5) 201 (62.6) χ2 = 5.189, p = 0.02*
  Male 124 (29.5) 120 (37.4)  
 Education level
  Lower education (BS/Diploma) 375 (89.1) 250 (77.9) χ2 = 17.177, p < 0.001*
  Higher education(MSN/PhD) 46 (10.9) 71 (22.1)  
 Job title
  Physicians 77 (18.3) 93 (29.0) χ2 = 49.667, p < 0.001*
  Nurses 254 (60.3) 110 (34.3)  
  Other professionals 90 (21.4) 118 (36.7)  
 Specialty
  Medical 292 (69.4) 196 (61.1) χ2 = 5.572, p = 0.02*
  Surgical 129 (30.6) 125 (38.9)  
 Work Experience (years)
  0–5 114 (27.1) 85 (26.5) χ2 = 2.504, p = 0.29
  6–10 83 (19.7) 50 (15.6)  
   > 10 224 (53.2) 186 (57.9)  
BLS-related characteristics
 Advanced life-support license
  None 263 (62.5) 220 (68.5) χ2 = 2.949, p = 0.086*
  ACLS/PACLS 158 (37.5) 101 (31.5)  
 Exposure to cardiac arrest cases in the previous year
  0 times 101 (24.0) 124 (38.6) χ2 = 20.230, p < 0.001*
  1–9 times 243 (57.7) 139 (43.3)  
   ≥ 10 times 77 (18.3) 58 (18.1)  
 Previous BLS training
  Once 64 (15.2) 65 (20.3) χ2 = 18.923, p < 0.001*
  Twice 74 (17.6) 90 (28.0)  
  Three and above 283 (67.2) 166 (51.7)  
  1. Abbreviations: ACLS advanced cardiovascular life support; BLS basic life support; PALS pediatric advanced life support, *statistical significance