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Table 6 Attitudes towards palliative care

From: Palliative care for patients with heart failure: facilitators and barriers - a cross sectional survey of German health care professionals

Please evaluate the following statements: Agreement
Cardiology, general medicine, and internal medicine could learn from the expertise of palliative care medicine. 159 (90.9 %)
A more intensive care is possible via palliative care. 154 (88.0 %)
The quality of remaining life can be optimized under palliative care. 154 (88.0 %)
The demand for palliative care in treating patients with heart failure is rising. 145 (82.9 %)
The demand for palliative care in treating patients with heart failure exists. 138 (78.9 %)
De-escalation of therapy often makes more sense than continuing the present therapy. 106 (60.6 %)
Patient with chronic heart failure do not have the feeling of being in a palliative situation. 100 (57.1 %)
The quality of life in patients with advanced heart failure will further diminish with the implementation of invasive therapies like heart assist devices. 84 (48.0 %)
It is not easy to determine the right time to initiate palliative care due to the difficulty in estimating the disease’s progression. 83 (47.4)
Patients do not request palliative care. 76 (43.3 %)
Patients might refuse further escalation of therapy when palliative care is offered. 25 (14.3 %)
Palliative care can be completely taken over by the attending general practitioner/cardiologist/internist. 22 (12.6 %)
Complex heart failure-specific therapies can be performed even in very old patients. Therefore, palliative care is not necessary. 11 (6.3 %)
Great progress has been made in heart failure therapy. Therefore, palliative care is not necessary. 5 (2.9 %)