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Table 2 Decomposition of inequality in the maternal health services utilization

From: Measuring and decomposing the inequality of maternal health services utilization in Western Rural China

  More than 4 times prenatal visits Hospital delivery More than 2 times postnatal visits
  Marginal effects Contributions Marginal effects Contributions Marginal effects Contributions
Women’s age       
 <20 -      
 20- 0.4015* 0.0226 0.1723* 0.0036 0.2247* −0.0032
 30- 0.5959* 0.0509 0.2657* 0.0069 0.1849* 0.0019
 40- 0.4848* 0.0078 0.3139 0.0129 0.0592 0.0000
 Ethnicity 0.3208* 0.0281 0.8199* 0.0158 0.1917* 0.0038
Parity       
 1 -      
 2 −0.2116* −0.0153 −0.1746* −0.0042 0.0147 0.0003
 > = 3 −0.4654* 0.0041 −0.4451* −0.0062 −0.0573 0.0063
Women education       
 Primary school -      
 Second school 0.1848* 0.0066 0.2208* 0.0025 −0.0679* 0.0019
 High school 0.3611* 0.0168 0.4035* 0.0058 −0.0377 0.0001
Husband education       
 Primary school -      
 Second school 0.1476* 0.0077 0.0979* 0.0184 0.1115* −0.0016
 High school 0.2303* 0.0115 0.1869* 0.0041 0.1964* −0.0025
Wealth index       
 Poor -      
 Middle 0.2506* 0.0165 0.1887* 0.0023 0.0552* 0.0002
 Good 0.2952* 0.0170 0.3590* 0.0037 −0.0479* 0.0007
  1. *The marginal effects demonstrate associations between determinants and maternal health services utilization outcomes. Those with positive signs indicate positive associations with the probability of maternal health services utilization, while those with negative signs indicate negative associations. In addition, the larger the absolute value of a marginal effect, more substantial is the association. Statistically significant estimates of marginal effects are highlighted (p<0.05).
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