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Table 4 Presence of enablers and barriers to effective resource allocation

From: Decision maker perceptions of resource allocation processes in Canadian health care organizations: a national survey

   % (#)  
  N= Strongly disagree Disagree Neither agree nor disagree Agree Strongly agree Mean, out of 5**
Resource allocation is closely aligned with other key processes, e.g., strategic planning, budgeting 92 2.2 (2) 8.7 (8) 9.8 (9) 54.3 (50) 25.0 (23) 3.82
We have a learning culture 92 1.1 (1) 9.8 (9) 14.1 (13) 58.7 (54) 16.3 (15) 3.79
We have strong leadership, including the presence of a champion for resource allocation processes 92 2.2 (2) 7.6 (7) 16.3 (15) 59.8 (55) 14.1 (13) 3.76
Management personnel have appropriate skills, knowledge, and capacity to implement the resource allocation process as intended 91 2.2 (2) 11.0 (10) 22.0 (20) 54.9 (50) 9.9 (9) 3.59
We have effective process management/facilitation 92 2.2 (2) 9.8 (9) 33.7 (31) 51.1 (47) 3.3 (3) 3.43
‘Politicking’ among participants, unwillingness to engage in ‘honest’ argumentation, efforts to ‘game the system’, [etc.] are [rare]* 92 3.3 (3) 23.9 (22) 27.2 (25) 28.3 (26) 17.4 (16) 3.33
There is […] trust among stakeholders* 92 0.0 (−−-) 22.8 (21) 33.7 (31) 33.7 (31) 9.8 (9) 3.30
The process is […] perceived as fair by affected stakeholders* 89 0.0 (−−-) 24.7 (22) 33.7 (30) 32.6 (29) 9.0 (8) 3.26
There is […] buy-in from key internal stakeholders* 91 0.0 (−−-) 29.7 (27) 31.9 (29) 31.9 (29) 6.6 (6) 3.15
Time and resource commitment required for our resource allocation process are manageable 90 5.6 (5) 26.7 (24) 20.0 (18) 44.4 (40) 3.3 (3) 3.13
We guarantee that no part of the organization will suffer disproportionate losses 92 1.1 (1) 37.0 (34) 38.0 (35) 23.9 (22) 0.0 (−−-) 2.85
We [have] sufficient data to make evidence-informed decisions* 92 13.0 (12) 34.8 (32) 20.7 (19) 27.2 (25) 4.3 (4) 2.75
  1. *=reverse coded.
  2. ** One to five scale, where 1=strongly disagree and 5=strongly agree.
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