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Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Community groups as ‘critical enablers’ of the HIV response in Zimbabwe

  • Morten Skovdal1, 3Email author,
  • Sitholubuhle Magutshwa-Zitha2,
  • Catherine Campbell3,
  • Constance Nyamukapa2, 4 and
  • Simon Gregson2, 4
BMC Health Services Research201313:195

DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-13-195

Received: 26 September 2012

Accepted: 16 May 2013

Published: 26 May 2013

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
26 Sep 2012 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
21 Dec 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Peter Hill
5 Mar 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Marisa Casale
5 Mar 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Alexis Palmer
1 Apr 2013 Author responded Author comments - Morten Skovdal
Resubmission - Version 3
1 Apr 2013 Submitted Manuscript version 3
9 Apr 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Marisa Casale
17 Apr 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Alexis Palmer
Resubmission - Version 4
Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
16 May 2013 Editorially accepted
26 May 2013 Article published 10.1186/1472-6963-13-195

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Health Promotion and Development, University of Bergen
(2)
Biomedical Research and Training Institute
(3)
Institute of Social Psychology, London School of Economics and Political Science
(4)
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London

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